Albert Munson House

When you're walking around the neighborhood west of the square, it is easy to imagine how the houses used to look a long time ago. They are older homes, but the yards and sidewalks are well-kept. Among the unique houses in the area, one in particular stands out. The story of the Munson House is even more unique than its architecture. This house is said to be haunted by the ghosts of the Munsons, who made contact with the spirit world during their lives. In fact, it is said that the Munsons themselves were present the day the house was moved from its original location. The Historical Society decided to move the house to prevent it from being destroyed to provide more parking on the square. However, there was so much rain that popped up from seemingly out of nowhere that the moving date had to be pushed back for several weeks. On the new moving date, the sun started shining for the first time in weeks and a rainbow appeared over the Munson House. Many said that the Munsons were ready for their home to be moved. The Munsons were an important family while they lived, and their home and its legacy have stood the test of time in order to be remembered today.

Images

Munson House 1877

Munson House 1877

Albert Munson is an important figure to Medina's community and history. He started as a representive on the legislature in Columbus and in 1877 he became probate judge. This is when Albert decided to move him and his wife, along with their 2 children, Lyman and Cora, to this Italianate home to be closer to work. If you look closely, you can see Albert Munson standing on the front porch. Photo courtesy of Historical Society View File Details Page

Albert Munson in the 1890s

Albert Munson in the 1890s

Albert Munson and his family lived at their house from 1878-1956 when his daughter Cora gave the house up to the Historical Society. Albert was a strong believer in the Spiritualists and was a strong supporter of the Republic party. Due to the fact he was a strong supporter, he and William McKinley became good friends and Albert began compaining for him. Albert would host campaign rallies when McKinley came to visit. Not only did they support the Republican party, the Munson family was also very active in Medina's life. In 1850, Albert married Harriet Easton and they had two children together. Their son Lyman was a huge helper around their local hardware store up until his death. His cause of death is uncertain but it is said to be related to drinking. Their daughter Cora followed in her dad's footsteps by becoming an active part of Medina's life up until her death in 1956 at the age of 99. Albert's face was a common sight to see back in the day and it still is today. Image courtesy of Victoria Patek View File Details Page

Munson Hardware in the 1940s

Munson Hardware in the 1940s

After Albert Munson retired from his position as the probate judge of Medina, he decided to open up a hardware store. Albert, his son Lyman and Cora, his daughter, all ran the harware store together. After Albert passed in 1911, Cora ran the shop for many years. Here it was built next to the Phoenix bank on the South Side of the Square. This too was built in the Victorian style as were many of the houses at that time. Image courtesy of Historical Society View File Details Page

Munson Hardware today

Munson Hardware today

The Munson's local hardware store, Munson A and Son Hardware, was a common place to go back then. It had all the popular houseware items that anyone needed. It was run by Albert, Lyman, and even Cora. Many of the towns people visited their store weekly, not only for the items but also to see the Munsons. The hardware store stayed in their name until Cora's death. Even though their store is long gone, the building and the architecture have remained the same. If you compare this picture to the other picture of the building years ago, you will see that the windows still have the same shape and the building in general really hasn't lost it's touch. Not even the changes of business down below have disturbed the building. If you walk into the building today, you can imagine the set up of how the hardware store was set up 100 years ago. Image courtesy of Victoria Patek View File Details Page

Front Parlor Today

Front Parlor Today

The Munsons were also known for having a medium come to their home to do readings. Albert and William McKinley became close friends because of their similar Republican views. As a result of their good friendship, there are reports of the Munson attempting to reach William after he was assassinated. Albert kept all these reading in a little book that he kept for himself. Supposlely when they talked to McKinley, he brought forward Lincoln, Garfield, (who were both Republicans) and even Cicero. There is also a reported incident where a spinning wheel has made multiple full turns at a certain time all by itself. When it was discovered that it would move, the spinning wheel was located in the front parlor where the seances took place. Due to the rumors of paranormal activity, the Historical Society invited local ghostbusters to come and investigate. They didn't find actual 'ghosts' but they did find numerous hot-spots located throughout the house. Image courtesy of Victoria Patek View File Details Page

Albert and his Spirit Children

Albert and his Spirit Children

Albert Munson and his family were Spiritiualists as so were many of the people in the late 1800s. Spiritualists believed that after someone died, you were still able to keep in touch with them because their life didn't stop at their physical being. During that time, mourning was a big deal and took place for days which is when the people would try to talk to their lost family/friends. The Munson took part in many of these readings and some even took place at their home. If you look closely at this picture, you are able to see more than 1 of his 'spirit children' whom they have reached. It's up to you to decide if these faces were painted or if they appeared with the flash. Image courtesy of Historical Society View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Emily Viskocil, Victoria Patek, Maria Barber, “Albert Munson House,” Discover Medina, accessed July 22, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/37.

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