Malloy-Paisley House

Situated in the heart of the South Court Street Historic Neighborhood District, the Malloy-Paisley Home stands as a testament to Medina's captivating history. From antique shop owners to town mayors, its residents have greatly enriched the surrounding community. The enthralling stories of the residence and its inhabitants throughout the past two centuries are worth delving into, and serve as evidence to the unmatched charm of the City of Medina. Its renovation in 1961 along with the addition of several updates throughout the past half century have finalized the blue street corner home into what most modern passersby recognize it as. This remodeling involved the replacing of servant's quarters on the East end of the home, the remnants of which are still apparent. Other antiquities include the stone slab in the front yard, the Rockefeller painting (with a fraudulent signature!) located in the breakfast room, and the knob on the newel post of the foot of the staircase, which may contain amity documents. Certain areas of the home illustrate themes throughout American history, as the servant's quarters correspond to American norms during post-Civil War reconstruction. The home's alleged connections to oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller also speak to its significance during the industrial time period, and the emphasis of capitalism on developing lands. This South Court St. home now belongs to the Edmonds family, who have maintained its upkeep and made modifications while still preserving its historical significance. 706 South Court St. has housed some of Medina's most celebrated individuals while exhibiting characteristics and undergoing changes reflective of time periods in both American and local history. Whether it's the withstanding of a 1905 arson attempt or repelling of ghosts with haint blue paint over the porch, this home has managed to remain standing for all to enjoy and understand for over thirteen decades, and will continue to do so for countless years ahead.

Images

Rockefeller's Barnz

Rockefeller's Barnz

Before the addition of the basket ball hoop and a fresh coat of blue paint, the garage at the back of the property, pictured here, was used as a barn. Current owner, Dave Edmonds explained that much care was put into the building of this structure, since in a farm community such as Medina, the barn was extremely important. During the early days of this home, it is said that John D. Rockefeller kept his horses in this barn to use for his trips to Chippewa Lake. Rockefeller frequented Chippewa Lake, along with other buisness tycoons and everyday citizens alike, because it was a beautiful destination with a cool lake and fun activities. Medina is a convienent stop on the way to the lake, and was often visited by travelers, such as Rockefeller. This legend is supported by a hand drawing of Rockefeller in the breakfast room that was drawn by a previous owner of the home. Unfortunately the signature at the bottom does not belong to Rockefeller, but is an admirer's imitation. Image courtesy of Christian Power View File Details Page

Old Appearance

Old Appearance

When the home was first built it was painted a bright white color with black shutters, much different than the blue hue the house has today. Many famous Medinains have graced the floor of this beautiful home. It has withstood an arson attempt, while Joseph Andrews was the owner, and a rennovation while Thomas Paisley was living here. It is a true test to the history of Medina. View File Details Page

Old Phoenix Bank 1876

Old Phoenix Bank 1876

The first owner of the home, Joseph Andrew, was a prominent Medinian in the late 19th century, for he was not only a veteran of the Civil War, where he lost his arm after the battle of Champion Hill, but went on to become Medina County Clerk of Courts, Mayor of Medina, and president of Old Phoenix Bank, shown here back in 1876. This is reflective of society at the time, where Capitalism was dominant, and the belief that anybody can become successful was a constant in the minds of the American people. Image Courtesy of Cleveland State University. Michael Schwartz Library. Special Collections View File Details Page

The Separation of Classes

The Separation of Classes

When this home was first built in 1874, it was divided into two sections. The front of the home, filled with its lavish and ornate detailing, was where the family would live; and the back of the home, which was smaller in size and considerably plainer, was used as the servant's quarters. Before the home was refurbished in 1961 by the Paisley family, there was a back staircase for the workers and a wall dividing the two portions of the home. When the stairs were taken away to accommodate the new building plans, this mark was left on the wall from where the stairs were painted around (see below). The dip in the ceiling and floor display how much smaller and unimpressive the servant's quarter was. It was little details such as this, that subconsciously enforced the class society in Medina during the late eighteen and early nineteen hundreds. Image Courtesy of Katie Morgan View File Details Page

Repelling Ghosts

Repelling Ghosts

Pictured above is the ceiling of the front porch of this antique Victorian home. As legend states, porch ceilings were painted blue to allow the spirits of those who have parted to ascend to the heavens. Residents believed that the blue color would confuse the spirits into thinking it was the sky, and they would leave this world. Image Courtesy of Christian Power View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Andrew Berndt, Katie Morgan, Christian Power, “Malloy-Paisley House,” Discover Medina, accessed July 23, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/36.
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