Parker-Lamb House

721 South Court Street is a noteworthy site in the history of the city of Medina. Paul Parker built the historic Eastlake Victorian home at the site in 1881. Mr. Parker was a prominent citizen of Medina, a man of extraordinary skill and principles. The many bridges in Medina, Lorain, Summit and Cuyahoga counties as well as the "Spring Mills" he built in Kentucky attest to his great skill and precision. The man was an ardent opponent of slavery and a dedicated member of the village council. Interestingly and tragically, Mr. Parker never saw his home completed. He died on February 22, 1884 due to, ironically, a construction accident during which a large rock fell against him and severely injured or broken his collarbone, ribs and shoulders. He died several days later, but not before putting his affairs in order.

Since that time it has been in the hands of three other noteworthy families: the Lower family from 1919 to 1944, the Vittel family until 1978 and finally Elaine and William Lamb, the current owners of the house. The Lambs have invested into restoring the house to its former style and glory, and it is due in part to their commendable effort that the South Court Street Historic Neighborhood Association has been able to attract so much interest within the Medina community.

The structure of the house is unique and an architectural marvel representative of the Victorian style. The beautiful brick corbeling, a central chimney as well as double doors at the main entrance add to the symmetry of the house. It is no wonder that the house was once named one of the handsomest residences in the village. The inside of the house was embellished with hand carved details and inscriptions as well as other expensive features and stained glass windows. The house, although forgotten through the decades, has regained its proper prominence and now stands a testament to the rich history of Medina County.

Images

Present Condition of the Home

Present Condition of the Home

The house is unique in that it exemplifies Easterlake and old Victorian features. Elaine and Bill Lamb, the current owners, restored the home to its former condition and style soon after moving in. While remodeling, they did as much as possible to make the exterior as close to its original appearance, thereby amplifying historic appeal and earning the attention of many Medinians. Image courtesy of Bill and Elaine Lamb View File Details Page

The McFadden Family

The McFadden Family

On the left of this picture is 721 South Court Street as it was seen over one century ago. Families, like the McFadden children pictured here, from many phases of America's history have owned this house, and as the rural agrarian society diminished, the house followed this trend by developing the farmland on its property. Image courtesy of Medina Historical Society Archives View File Details Page

Wood Detailing

Wood Detailing

When 721 South Court St. was built in 1881, steam power was just becoming popular in home construction. It was this new innovation that allowed for such intricate detail in the woodwork of the home, as shown in the picture above. This is reflective of both Paul Parker's ingenuity and impressive affluence; his impressive wealth and love for new innovations allowed the home to become a timeless marvel. Image courtesy of Madeline Kranz View File Details Page

Confederate Money

Confederate Money

Paul Parker served in the Civil War and must have collected some Confederate money during his experience. During renovations of the house in the 1970s, the Lambs discovered this hidden above a doorframe. Why this money was hidden along with a hammer and a newspaper is still a mystery. Image courtesy of Madeline Kranz View File Details Page

Basement Stairs

Basement Stairs

The dents in these stone basement stairs were the result of an unfortunate incident in 1884. Paul Parker was overseeing the transport of a heavy limestone block down the stairs when it crushed him against the wall. His expertise and familiarity with these stones from his job as construction supervisor could not save him from death. Parker died from internal injuries and never got to see the house he had worked on for three years completed. Image courtesy of Madeline Kranz View File Details Page

Audio

A Mystery in the Walls

No one knows why there was Confederate money hidden inside a door frame along with a hammer. Especially so far away from the south. Mr. Parker must have picked up the money during his time in the Civil War. View File Details Page

Paul Parker's Accident

Paul Parker, a council member and a prominent citizen of Medina, died on February 24, 1884. His legacy, however, remained behind in form of both his bridges across Medina and his magnificent house. View File Details Page

Paul Parker Epitaph

One fateful day for Paul Parker. | Source: 2015 - 2016 MHS Sherri Hufford's Junior Language Arts Course. | Creator: Callum Parnell and Austin Kinzelman View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Ekaterina Knyazkova, Sarah Horton, Brittany Flamik, “Parker-Lamb House,” Discover Medina, accessed June 23, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/27.

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