11-12 Public Square

Ever since the beginning Medina Square has been a beautiful upcoming attraction, full of new stores and new faces. JP Miller, an experienced merchant for over 45 years had been the oldest known merchant in the community. His store, JP Miller Dry Goods, at the time became one of the places that everyone in town went to for millinery, fancy goods, and dry goods. During the midst of the Industrial Revolution, Miller’s store boomed.
Throughout the years, the store has been everything from a candy shop, an insurance agency, and it’s present day state, as an ice cream parlor. Tony’s Candy Kitchen had been built in 1938, 68 years after the building had been originally built. Tony’s Candy Kitchen thrived despite the ongoing Depression, because Medina had not been not majorly affected by the stock market crash.
JP Miller, the original owner, had a lot of pride toward his building and would want it in the hands of a trustworthy person. Before Miller passed away, he left his nephew, Frank Miller, his company. For years, Frank ran the dry good store until selling it to another businessman. After the original sale, the building has been passed from owner to owner. JP Miller would have wanted the building to stay in the family, but would not be mad at Frank due to his businesslike nature. Looking at the businesses, JP Miller would have felt a great pride in being the original owner of the building and watching the building become a prosperous addition to the square.
Related Sources: Franklin Sylvester Room of Medina Public Library, Medina Historical Society, Medina Recorder’s Office

Images

The Beginning

The Beginning

Located in the midst of a frenzy and surrounded by the day-to-day hustle and b bustle of the booming square, 11 Public Square served as a pinnacle of supplies. Known as JP Miller's Dry Goods in the 1870's, citizens walked up and down the streets and may have looked into the store front to see fine millinery, fancy goods, and dry goods. (Image Courtesy of Medina Historical Society) View File Details Page

Present Day

Present Day

As of Spring 2015, the building serves as an artisan ice cream store, called Chill. The store was opened by three brothers, Jeremy, Patrick, and Zach. A wide variety of over 50 flavors are available to sample, all of which are homemade right on site. While spending a balmy summer afternoon on the square, shopping, grabbing lunch, it would be an excellent idea to stop in for cool ice cream. (Image taken by Caitlyn Kasper) View File Details Page

It All Goes Down in Flames

It All Goes Down in Flames

The early morning of April 15th brought along a conflagration of massive flames to the small town of Medina, leaving it in shambles. The square caught fire around 2:00 AM, originating in the barber shop which was mostly constructed of wood, making it an easily spread fire. The town smoldered for hours, due to the lack of connection to a railroad system, telegraph wiring system, and absolutely no fire station or even an engine. Again in 1877, another fire erupted in the square, but only demolishing three buildings in its blazing force. Yet another fire occurred before the town decided to build the firehouse, which is currently a museum located on the square. (Image Courtesy to the Cleveland Memory Project) View File Details Page

Flames to the Future

Flames to the Future

After the 1870 fire, the small modest town of Medina, consisting of a population of 3,000 citizens was left with a demolished square of only two remaining buildings. One of these two buildings was JP Miller's Dry Goods and the other was the original Courthouse, where the Courthouse Pizzeria is now located. The citizens preserved the Courthouse by uniting in a bucket brigade in order to preserve the deeds and town information. These are the floor supports found in the basement of Chill, burnt from the first initial fire. The chard beams are evidence of the strong architecture of the Italianate era, supporting the building for the past 240 years. (Image taken by Caitlyn Kasper) View File Details Page

Time Keeps TIcking

Time Keeps TIcking

This clock has kept citizens on time been outside the building of 11 Public Square for years, as evidenced by the horse and buggy in the background of the photo. The Community Design Committee (CDC) has updated this clock throughout the years. The CDC works to preserve the historic attributes of Medina's community, fixing up the small details of the years. They work to beautify the town by planting trees, flowers, and updating pieces of the buildings. Looking at the background of the two photos, the present day is seen with trees, and mulch. This is due to the work of the CDC. Compare the two photos and see the modern day cars, stop lights, and paved roads. Without the effort of these visionary individuals, a great deal of history and beauty may have been lost over the years. (Left image courtesy to Cleveland Memory Project, Right image taken by Caitlyn Kasper) View File Details Page

Audio

A Glimpse into a Dream Teenagehood

Sarah Ingraham was born and raised in the Small town of Medina. She graduated from Medina High School with the Class of 1955. Throughout her highs school years, her and her friends frequently visited the square which was a focal point of the community. On Wednesday nights, Sarah and her friends would often attend the ballroom dances at the current First Merit Bank, and grab a milkshake from Isley's beforehand. Isley's was a locally owned restaurant that resided in the building of 11-12 Public Square. Many teens gathered here to hangout and talk, while enjoying sweet foods. View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Maisey Juka, Caitlyn Kaspar, and Brianna Harding , “11-12 Public Square ,” Discover Medina, accessed March 24, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/269.

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