Williams and Batchelder

The Medina square symbolizes a bustling small town that epitomizes americana. Strolling down the street in front of businesses are wives, mothers and women shopping for the week. Kids are running through the centrally located park and bells ring every hour from the churches. Each bell may mean something different depending on the character. 7:00 am bells call businesses to open their doors, 12:00 bells symbolize lunch time and 6:00 pm bells summon children back to their houses in time for a hot meal made by their mothers who bought the ingredients this morning on the same street the children are coming back from. It’s 7:00 after a long day at the office and the two attorneys decide to relieve some stress and take a stroll around the now calmer, but still busy square. They walk around until they reach the local restraunt and stop for a quick refreshment. Restraunts are notorious for being the center of the town gossip and faster than the newspapers, this restraunt is no exception. Open entering the men are greeted with a swarm of interested people asking about their most recent case. The men brush off the many questions and explain that business is left at the office. The church sings it’s song at 8:00 and the men head home. Tomorrow, the square will relive its day in an almost identical pattern, including the law firm that will eventually become Williams & Batchelder.

Images

The top of the Public Square<br /><br />

The top of the Public Square

Medina, the perfect place for law firms, welcomes more people to Medina who are settling down. Businesses are growing and most shops and informational centers are on the square. A law firm to take advantage of the opportunity includes Woodward, Andrew & Licey law firm, located over the Phoenix National Bank. On April 2, 1880 Mr. A.D. Licey retires from his previous law firm and decides to expand farther out into the world and broaden his horizons. Licey joins Frank Heath and forms a partnership with both of their offices in Medina, Oh and River Styx. Later on April 29, 1887 Frank Heath moves his law office above the Albro's drug store on the corner of Washington and Court Street. May 13, 1887 Licey and Heath part ways on a mutual agreement and Licey continued practicing in River Styx and Heath in Medina. Image Courtesy of Medina Archives View File Details Page

Aerial view of the Public Square

Aerial view of the Public Square

After Licey retires from the firm, Frank Heath looks around town to find a partnership to replace Licey and help run his firm in Medina. Heath wants to continue his law firm in Medina, preferably the public square because of all the people continuing to migrate to Medina Country and specifically the square. Shops are popping up in the square, which brings people into town for business and pleasure. Since the businesses and shops are close by, many people choose to shop and do business locally in the square where it can be convenient to travel and only a day's trip. Frank heath finally finds John Weber, of Liverpool township joins Frank Heath to help run the firm after John graduated from Western Reserve Law School in 1917 and continues on the square. Image Courtesy of Medina Archives. View File Details Page

Top view of West Liberty Street

Top view of West Liberty Street

In 1931 however Frank Heath passes away at the age of 79 years old. Since the death of Frank Heath his business partner, John starts looking for a new partner to continue the firm under and continue the same success he had with Heath. John decides to look for someone who's learning experience he already knows and whose concepts of law he know as well. John chooses a graduate of Western Reserve Law School, Harold Williams, because he himself graduated from Western Reserve Law School. In 1932 both men begin their practice under the name of Weber and Williams. Their practice continues on the public square. Image Courtesy of Medina Archives View File Details Page

William Batchelder Jr. and Wife

William Batchelder Jr. and Wife

In 1958, John Weber passes away and Harold Williams offers William Batchelder a position as partner in his law firm because of the reputation Batchelder has an attorney and prosecutor in Medina County. Harold also asks Batchelder for partnership because Williams wants to continue his practice in Medina because of the success he has on the square. The success contributed to the auditor being right down the street, recorder's office near by, and court house close by as well. Williams soon joins Batchelder on 124 W. Washington. Williams and Batchelder becomes the largest attorney's office within six lawyers and becomes the best-known law firm in Medina County. Image Courtesy of the Akron Beacon Journal View File Details Page

Batchelder Family

Batchelder Family

The Batchelder family, considered a dynasty of Medina, are ingrained in and influencing our town for many years and generations. The eldest Batchelder, William G. batchelder jr. (picture in far left), starts off his career by holding the position of county prosecutor. Carrying a reputation for quoting the bible in court, he is a trial attorney to remember. By heading up William & Batchelder the firm experiences a lot of growth until his sad passing on May 7, 2011. His son, William G. Batchelder III (Bill Batchelder, pictured in far right), follows the footsteps of his father and continues the Batchelder legacy of success. He becomes the 101st Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives (2011-2014). Image Courtesy of Akron Beacon Journal View File Details Page

Revco Building

Revco Building

After the fire on February 2, 1887 the Empire Block looked for people to buy the building. S.G. Barnard bought the building and built a two-story brick building. Barnard put his law firm, Bostwick and Barnard in the corner and a dry goods store right next door. Later in the 1960s the Community Design Committee looks for businesses to invest and restore local businesses. Revco however refuses to corporate and renovate the building. The Batchelder's look for a way in. The Batchelder's buy the building and put their law office on the top floor above The City Loan. The Batchelder's also threaten Revco by saying they will find a new tenant if the building is not renovated. Revco finally breaks down and agrees. Image courtesy of Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Williams and Batchelder

Williams and Batchelder

On any present day in Medina. a stroll around the scenic public square will result in a saunter down West Liberty Street and consequently right pass the William & Batchelder firm. The firm can be found on the Barnard Block at 10 W. Liberty St. It shares the building with it's net door neighbor Cool Beans and downstairs The Bookshelf. Cool Beans brings in students, college students, and adults to hang out and sip delicious coffee while typing away on any type of work. The Bookshelf, run by the nonprofit organization Project: LEARN provides charge free tutoring for adults who need assistance passing the GED test and learning to read or learning English. By being located in such a prime spot, the firm's building itself brings great advertisement. The firm today can be such an influence on Media life and current times. Image Courtesy of Leah Steirer and Holly Schneider View File Details Page

Audio

William Batchelder and wife Eleanor

Joann King of Medina Historical Society talking about William Batchelder Jr. and his wife Eleanor. View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Leah Steirer and Holly Schneider, “Williams and Batchelder ,” Discover Medina, accessed April 26, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/240.

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