Austin Badger

It is the late 1700s, and Native American tribes are still very much present in the midwest. The British are also still unhappy with America’s status as an independant nation and in the War of 1812 they will challenge that status once again. And settlers are moving West to settle unknown lands. However, not all attempts to settle land were successful. In addition, trade is still a very common practice among the Native Americans, French and British. Because of the interaction between the different cultures religion and the practice of it becomes a spark for dispute and the only protection settlers have from the Native Americans are arms or the military. It was a time of expansion and of growth; but also a time of uncertainty and fear.

A man named Austin Badger arrived in Medina in 1818, he had already served three times in the War of 1812 and would come to leave his mark on Medina. After risking his life in the War of 1812, Austin Badger chose to come and settle Medina. Settlers just like him would risk failure, ridicule, and Native American attacks to settle land and try to make a new life for themselves. The building where Cool Beans Cafe is, was a log cabin that Austin Badger built. He would then open a tavern there and even help to build the courthouse. And on a nice sunny, breezy day he would preside over Medina’s first Fourth of July celebration. He was one of the first surveyors of Medina County, he helped build many of the buildings around the Square and even helped mentor young adults in the county.

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The Life of Austin Badger

The Life of Austin Badger

Austin Badger, born in Chenango County, New York, was widowed four times in his life and opened a tavern with his friend Alzono Hickox where Cool Beans sits today. He was Montville Township's first settler, and one of the first to survey Medina County. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Life in Medina

Life in Medina

Austin Badger came to Medina in 1818 and in 1819 he became the first resident of Montville Township. He built the first building on the Square, helped build the courthouse and created the green space in the square. Between 1859 and 1879 he resided at 415 East Liberty Street. He died in 1883 at the age of 90. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Summer Days

Summer Days

School is out and it is time for the fun to begin! Children would, of course, help around the house by doing chores and helping their parents with tasks. However, they were not far from the center of town, which would allow them to spend sunny afternoons running in and out of shops, visiting friends and generally having a good time. Image courtesy of Mr. Jim Cook and the Medina County Historical Society View File Details Page

Native Americans

Native Americans

During the late 1700s and early 1800s Native American attacks were still a very real threat. Settlers would often be attacked and scalped, the only real protection was from the military or arms. Image Courtesy of "The History of the State of Ohio" by John S. C. Abbott. Published 1875. View File Details Page

Fourth of July

Fourth of July

In 1820 Austin Badger presided over Medina's first 4th of July celebration. He created Medina's first American flag by tying a bandana to a pole and placing it in a hollow beach tree stump. During the festivities Medina's residents named the streets surrounding the Square. The names that they picked still remain today: Liberty, Washington Court, Broadway. Image Courtesy of "Remembering Medina County" by Judy A. Totts. Published in 2009. View File Details Page

The First Log Cabin

The First Log Cabin

Austin Badger helped to build the first log cabin on the square, it was locates where Cool Beans is today. The first floor of the cabin functioned as a Tavern for weary travelers and the second floor functioned as a court house. Image Courtesy of the Medina County Historical Society and Mr. Jim Cook View File Details Page

Audio

Austin Badger Epitaph

Men and women who settled the Northwest Territory were among the toughest of Americans. | Source: 2015 MHS Sherri Hufford's Junior Language Arts Course. | Creator: Jessica Blankenship and Veronica Santiago View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Lisa Gemmer, “Austin Badger,” Discover Medina, accessed April 29, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/203.

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