The Badger - Cook Home

A warm summer day, there are festivities all along the Square, people are joyfully shouting to one another, children are playing and there is a nice breeze. A bandana flows lazily from a pole stuck in a beech tree stump-Medina's first American flag. It is the Fourth of July in 1820. There is music floating lazily on the breeze, coming down East Liberty Street from the Square. Ears perk up to the jubilant tones of Fourth of July music, and the source of it is only a quick walk down the street. Medina's Square was the center of life throughout the eighteen and nineteen hundreds, living on East Liberty Street or another street right off the Square allowed a continued connection to the hustle and bustle and activities of Medina. That is still the case today with small cafes and shops dotting the Square, activities including the weekly Farmers Market and International Fest, and the warm, inviting picturesque quality of the Gazebo.

Images

The Cook Home

The Cook Home

Standing on a plot of land at 415 East Liberty Street, this house has sheltered a rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, a War of 1812 veteran, and everything in between. Image courtesy of the Medina County Gazette View File Details Page

Austin Badger

Austin Badger

Austin Badger was a very influential Medinian who also resided in 415 East Liberty Street. Born in New York in 1793, he arrived in Ohio in 1818 and was the first surveyor of Medina to actually live there. In 1812 he volunteered for the militia in the War of 1812 and was present when the British burned Buffalo, New York. He built the first building on the Medina Town Square, a two story building where Cool Beans Cafe is today. The first story was a tavern and the second functioned as a court room. He had a considerable influence over the design of the Square's green space and in 1820 presided over Medina's first Fourth of July ceremony. Medina's first American flag was displayed at that ceremony and the streets surrounding the square were named. Austin Badger died in 1883 at the age of 90 and is buried in the Old Town Graveyard. Image Courtesy of Gloria Brown and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

St. Paul's Episcopal Church

St. Paul's Episcopal Church

William Granville, a rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in the 1800s resided in 415 East Liberty Street. He served as rector from March 7th 1836 to May 1884 and he was the first rector to make his permanent home in Medina. Image courtesy of Gloria Brown and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

A Family at Work

A Family at Work

In the eighteen and early nineteen hundreds people worked harder for many of the comforts that we do not even give a second thought to today. These adults could have been getting water from a well, making ice cream or churning butter. Many families worked alongside each other to complete the chores that were necessary to keep the household running. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

An Afternoon of Telling Tales

An Afternoon of Telling Tales

In this era there were no phones, there was no internet or TV, video games had not yet been invented and the first ipod would not come out for 151 years. So what, you ask, did people do to entertain themselves. They talked and told stories, visited the center of town and relaxed with neighbors. These men could be sharing childhood stories or talking about the latest election results, or just spending a relaxing afternoon with friends and a bit of nice conversation. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

A Happier Time

A Happier Time

A silly family picture, probably taken by a relative or friend at a family gathering or a simple Sunday dinner. The family is laughing and having fun, chores are done and cares are forgotten for a moment. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Family Time

Family Time

Over 75 years ago this family stood outside of the house at 415 East Liberty street while this photograph was taken. They could have been going to the Square or to Church, of course they would have walked and visited with friends along the way. Image Courtesy of Jim cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Snow Day

Snow Day

A beautiful snow has fallen overnight and is still coming down. The children are asleep dreaming of snowball fights, snow angels and snowmen. The man of the house is out shoveling the front walk and thinking of the family he will get to spend time with on this snow day. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Grandchildren

Grandchildren

The spring breeze lolls around the trees and through the flower beds, while grandparents, siblings and friends take advantage of the lovely weather. A young child sits with a grandparent, listening to stories, playing games and enjoying their time together. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Outdoor Fun

Outdoor Fun

Living on East Liberty Street in the eighteen and nineteen hundreds would have meant a connection to the daily hustle and bustle of the square. Families could engage in the festivities of the Fourth of July or just a nice Saturday of shopping and dining. the children would have had friends close by to play with and when they were older the Square would have become the place to hang out. Image Courtesy of Gloria Brown and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Adults

Adults

Look at the women in the photograph, they are smoking and the expressions on their faces convey a sureness of themselves that would have been new to many women during during this time period. And look at the young girl, what must she be thinking of these forward thinking womenz Image courtesy of Mr. Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

School House

School House

At one time 415 East Liberty was home to a small, one room school house. Children would have come from all over Medina to learn and grow under its roof. During renovations at the house maps were found taped to the walls along with posters of other things such as presidents. Walking into the house it is amazing to think that more than 100 years ago the main room would have housed a teacher and students from all over Medina County laughing and learning. Image courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Reunion

Reunion

Cars were not on the roads until the 1920s, the trolley car went from Cleveland to Wooster, but families would often go without visiting one another for long periods of time. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

A Celebration of America

A Celebration of America

The breeze is whispering through the flags that are hung on every house and business. Friends and family are gathering for this picture; there is laughing and shouting, jovial greetings and lengthy conversations before the picture is finally taken. Image Courtesy of Jim Cook and the Medina Historical Society View File Details Page

Audio

Medina's Trolly Cars

Mr. Jim Cook talks about how people traveled around Medina before automobiles. View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Lisa Gemmer, “The Badger - Cook Home,” Discover Medina, accessed March 26, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/199.
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