Public Square

Many different cities around the Country continue to show and exhibit a town's heritage, Medina, is one of them. The Public Square and the buildings in the historic district surrounding the uptown park were recognized as the cultural and social center of Medina since its colonizing nearly two centuries ago. Today, the city’s historic center defines the image of the community. Beloved by Medina’s residents, the Public Square is a source of tremendous pride and it has often been cited as a key reason why people choose to live in Medina. The Medina public square emerged in the Victorian time (1837-1901) and were therefore built in the Victorian style. On November 30 1818, Elijah Boardman deeded the public square area of Medina in order to secure Medina as the county seat. Business and residential buildings quickly sprang up along the four streets surrounding the center of the square.

After the fire in 1870, city leaders vowed to rebuild Medina.Victorian era commercial buildings gave Medina’s uptown its unique historic style. During the 1960’s America was going through a phase called modernization. The square was affected by this, the old historic buildings were covered up with a new modern look. By 1967, a group of Medina citizens grew concerned that Public Square about the lost its historic looks. They formed the Community Design Committee (CDC)and worked with many other companies to help bring Medina back to its authentic state. Many different festivals now take place on the Medina Public Square and help people appreciate the history of the square.

Images

The Gazebo

The Gazebo

When you enter the square of Medina the first thing that catches your eye is the Gazebo. The Gazebo is as much a symbol of the square today, as it was when it was built in 1972 during times of freedoms and anti-war. It was modeled after the Gazebo in Belleville, Ohio. Although it was built 40 years ago it is still in good shape and looks like brand new. It has pretty decorations on top and is often the stage for bands. The Gazebo is found in the middle of the historical center of Medina. Around it are the Old Firehouse and the Courthouse. It holds the historical district together and gives it a center. Whenever there is an event in Medina it is centered around the Gazebo. Image courtesy of The Medina County Gazette View File Details Page

Teenage Dance on the Square, 1964

Teenage Dance on the Square, 1964

In the 1960's before the Gazebo was built, teenagers would gather together on summer nights to enjoy dances and social time with their fellow high school classmates, key to the social life of the youth in Medina. This shows that there already have been festivals on the square before the Medina Gazebo was built, and how more and more activities has emerged over the last decades. Picture Courtesy: Linda Conley View File Details Page

Hug the Earth Festival

Hug the Earth Festival

The first Hug the Earth Festival took place in 1991 at the Medina Career Center. You can have a look at earth-friendly exhibitions and learn something about how you can protect our environment. Today the Earth Day is still present at the Medina County Park District. Photo courtesy: The Gazette Archive View File Details Page

The Medina Ice Festival

The Medina Ice Festival

Every year in February since 1995 there is a beautiful ice festival on the Medina square. There is an ice carving competition with carvers from a five state area in individual and team competition for medals and demonstration. Most of the time there are more than 30 frozen sculptures. You can see people walking around and taking pictures with the sculptures like this little boy. Photo courtesy: The Gazette Archive View File Details Page

Medina-Toth Mini-Grand Prix

Medina-Toth Mini-Grand Prix

The Mini Grand Prix was in 1996 for the first time hosted in Medina. All the roads around the square were closed to be used as the track for the race. This was only possible with quite a bit of help from Mayor Mark Morse. The event had emphasis on safety and thought it of highly importance. The event went down on Father's Day, which made many speed loving-families show up. The community groups showed their happiness of hosting the race, by providing food for all participants. Image courtesy: The Gazette Archive View File Details Page

Spirits Of The Past

Spirits Of The Past

'A walk with spirits of the past' was a concept Donna Bica brought to Medina from the city of Warren here in Ohio. She liked the idea of the citizens learning about their own communities' history, while supporting local actors. In 1996 the first walk was therefore reality. Since then it has been a reoccuring event every year, with six different stories to be told. Image courtesy: The Gazette Archive View File Details Page

The International Festival

The International Festival

Travel around the world but stay in Medina. That is the motto of the Medina International Festival. Since 2008 you can come to the square and learn something about other countries and try different food. For example in the Chinese section you can try to eat with chopsticks or learn how to write your name with Chinese letters. Sponsors of the festival are "The gazette", "Medina hospital" and "First Ment Bank". Photo courtesy: www.mainstreetmedina.com/international-festival.html View File Details Page

Medina Community Design Committee

Medina Community Design Committee

Hometown USA was a fan of Medina and it became a city by virtue of the population of Medina in 1950, when there was some 20,000 people. Mr. Ziegler, the owner of Ziegler's store on the square in the 1960's said this about the Community Design Committee during an interview with Kate Brown in 1992: "It was all rebuilt and it was built within a, maybe, ten years span, so one building to the next is very similar. So maybe it required a little bit of elbow grease paint and things like that, and we have the appearance here that everything is tied together. In fact the Community Design Committee who first began this project, I don't know, twenty, twenty four years ago. Other communities want to do the same thing. Dozens and dozens of inquiries into what they have accomplished here and it is interesting to note it was done without any public money. So strictly because of the interest by people, who have an interest in our simple little town." View File Details Page

Trees on the Square Lost to Dutch Elm Disease

Trees on the Square Lost to Dutch Elm Disease

According to members of the Women's Auxiliary, the square used to be full of Elm trees, but were lost to the Dutch Elm Disease. They even had boxes in them for the squirrels. The community was devastated by the loss, so groups began planted the trees back. View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Emma Park, Katharina Nossa, and Sofie Christensen, “Public Square,” Discover Medina, accessed July 24, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/133.

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