The Medina Historical Society

The house was built by John Smart, a metal worker, back in the late 1800's. John Smart brought the foundry industry to Medina which greatly helped its economy due to the time period. More families lived in the house after the Smarts who have legacies that live on today. The Baldwin family moved in after the Smarts had moved to Cleveland to be closer to their daughters. The Baldwin family consisted of two loving parents, a daughter, and two mischievous boys. The Baldwin boys were also known for laying the remaining brick roads that are still in Medina. The Baldwin father was the owner and editor of the Medina County Gazette which also meant that his home was the social and political area of the town. The next family who moved in was the Hammerschmidt family. The family consisted of a father who was a florist, two daughters, a nurturing mother, and two sons. One of Hammerschmidts sons, Bill, actually helped invent the color television! Since a young age he showed an interest in electronics by climbing on top of the roof and creating radio signals as well as making radios. So without his thinking, color television may not even exist today. After the Hammerschmidt family moved out, the house was taken by the Medina Eagles. The Medina Eagles is a mens club in which men are able to escape the home life and have some fun. After the Eagles left, Medina county government offices were held in the home until about 1985 when the historical society took its rightful place in the household. Through the families who lived here and the influences they had, the Medina Historical society has picked phenomenal place to house the history of our beloved home. So why do we need a place to hold our history? The answer is that we must preserve this place forever because it will forever preserve Medina.

Images

Where It All Started

Where It All Started

Seen in this photo are portraits of John Smart and his wife. After building this house, Smart brought the foundry industry to Medina which manufactured skillets, irons, and many metal tools that are found in the kitchen. The two daughters of the smarts had their wedding held in this parlor before moving to Cleveland. Dead bodies of past residents were also laid in this very spot. Photo Courtesy Of Brendon McLellan View File Details Page

The Historical Society

The Historical Society

The roots of the Medina Historical society have reached back as far as 1922. Although, the Historical Society moved into this house in 1985. The historical society still sits in this house today at 206 N Elmwood Avenue with all of Medinas important heritage. By putting history in a historical home, it puts the people who walk in feel as if they are in a historical setting. One may walk in today and feel how the Smarts felt walking into their home, this is why Medina chose this house to put the Historical Society in. Photo courtesy of antiqueshopsinohio.com/ View File Details Page

Brick Roads

Brick Roads

This brick road was laid out by the Baldwin boys along with other streets in Medina. Imagine how long the process would take to lay hundreds of bricks everywhere! A story is often told of how the boys would sneak smoke breaks behind large piles of bricks while putting the road in. The fun and games eventually ended when their father caught them! Photo courtesy of Brendon McLellan View File Details Page

Falling Off The Balcony

Falling Off The Balcony

One of the stories told by the historians that work at the historical society was how one of the Baldwin boys fell off the second story balcony! He had a bad reputation for sleepwalking when one night it went too far as he woke up while falling from the second floor! The boys also poured water on unsuspecting Trick or Treaters from this balcony! This was just one of the many mischievous pranks that the Baldwin boys pulled. Photo Courtesy Of Brendon McLellan View File Details Page

Steps To Future Fame

Steps To Future Fame

The Hammerschmidts son would climb up this way to the roof. Back then they had slate roofs which would be easy to slip on if one was not paying attention. Hammerschmidts boy would climb on top off the roof to test radio signals of radios that he had made. This inspiration helped because eventually he would help create color television. Photo Courtesy Of Brendon McLellan View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Brendon McLellan , “The Medina Historical Society ,” Discover Medina, accessed May 26, 2017, http://discovermedina.org/items/show/110.

Share this Story